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Development of emergency medicine administration in the People’s Republic of China

  • Edbert B. Hsu
    Correspondence
    Reprint Address: Edbert Hsu, md, mph, Department of Emergency Medicine, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 201 N. Charles Street, Suite 1400, Baltimore, MD 21201
    Affiliations
    Center for International Emergency, Disaster and Refugee Studies, Departments of Emergency Medicine and International Health, The Johns Hopkins University Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland
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  • Chayan C. Dey
    Affiliations
    Center for International Emergency, Disaster and Refugee Studies, Departments of Emergency Medicine and International Health, The Johns Hopkins University Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland
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  • James J. Scheulen
    Affiliations
    Center for International Emergency, Disaster and Refugee Studies, Departments of Emergency Medicine and International Health, The Johns Hopkins University Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland
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  • Gregory H. Bledsoe
    Affiliations
    Center for International Emergency, Disaster and Refugee Studies, Departments of Emergency Medicine and International Health, The Johns Hopkins University Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland
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  • Michael J. VanRooyen
    Affiliations
    Center for International Emergency, Disaster and Refugee Studies, Departments of Emergency Medicine and International Health, The Johns Hopkins University Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland
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      Abstract

      A collaborative partnership between the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Chaoyang Red Cross Hospital and Chinese Ministry of Health has been established to initiate Emergency Medicine (EM) administrative training in Beijing, China. The Emergency Medical Education and Training Center (EMETC) at Chaoyang Red Cross Hospital was opened as a training facility to foster EM administrative curriculum development and training nationwide. A six-step approach with problem identification, needs assessment, goals and objectives, educational strategies, implementation and evaluation was used to form a locally adapted curriculum. With a train-the-trainers model, the EMETC sponsored several EM administration courses, the first of their kind in China. Since its inception, the EMETC has trained 95 persons from throughout China in EM administration. An EM administration curriculum has been developed and refined. In conclusion, an international partnership between academic hospitals, supported by the local Ministry of Health, to develop a national training facility using this six-step approach may be an attractive strategy for dissemination of EM administration principles.

      Keywords

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