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Injury Pattern of the Stingball

  • Chris C. Feier
    Correspondence
    Reprint Address: Chris Feier, md, pharmd, LAC+USC Medical Center, Unit 1, Room 1011, 1200 N State St., Los Angeles, CA 90033
    Affiliations
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Medical Center and the Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
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  • William Mallon
    Affiliations
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Medical Center and the Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
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      Abstract

      The stingball is a “maximum effect device” delivering up to four stimuli for psychological and physiological effect, including rubber pellets, light, sound, and an optional chemical agent. The purpose of this case report is to describe the injury patterns of a less-lethal weapon that has been in use for over 20 years. Although the stingball has been available for many years, there is very little experience with it in the medical community. We describe the case of an inmate at Los Angeles county jail brought to LAC+USC Emergency Department after sustaining injuries from the deployment of a stingball to break up a jail riot.

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