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The Most Effective Rescuer's Position for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Provided to Patients on Beds: A Randomized, Controlled, Crossover Mannequin Study

  • Author Footnotes
    1 Chong Kun Hong and Sang O Park are the first authors, who contributed equally to the study.
    Chong Kun Hong
    Footnotes
    1 Chong Kun Hong and Sang O Park are the first authors, who contributed equally to the study.
    Affiliations
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Changwon, Republic of Korea

    Department of Emergency Medicine, Daejin Medical Center, Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital, Sungnam, Republic of Korea
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Chong Kun Hong and Sang O Park are the first authors, who contributed equally to the study.
    Sang O Park
    Footnotes
    1 Chong Kun Hong and Sang O Park are the first authors, who contributed equally to the study.
    Affiliations
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • Han Ho Jeong
    Affiliations
    Department of Emergency Medical Technology, Masan University, Changwon, Republic of Korea
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  • Jung Hyun Kim
    Affiliations
    Department of Emergency Medical Technology, Masan University, Changwon, Republic of Korea
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  • Na Kyoung Lee
    Affiliations
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Changwon, Republic of Korea
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  • Kyoung Yul Lee
    Affiliations
    Department of Physical Education, Kyungnam University, Changwon, Republic of Korea
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  • Younghwan Lee
    Affiliations
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Hallym Sacred Heart Hospital, School of Medicine, Hallym University, Anyang, Republic of Korea
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  • Jun Ho Lee
    Affiliations
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Changwon, Republic of Korea
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  • Seong Youn Hwang
    Correspondence
    Reprint Address: Seong Youn Hwang, md, Department of Emergency Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Changwon 630-522, Republic of Korea
    Affiliations
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Changwon, Republic of Korea
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 Chong Kun Hong and Sang O Park are the first authors, who contributed equally to the study.
Published:November 21, 2013DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jemermed.2013.08.085

      Abstract

      Background

      The effectiveness of chest compressions for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is affected by the rescuer's position with respect to the patient. In hospitals, chest compressions are typically performed while standing beside the patient, who is placed on a bed.

      Study Objectives

      To compare the effectiveness of chest compressions, performed on a bed during 2 min of CPR, among three different rescuer positions: standing, on a footstool, or kneeling on the bed.

      Methods

      We performed a crossover randomized simulation trial. Participants were recruited from among students in the Department of Paramedics from July to August 2011. Thirty-eight participants were enrolled, and they performed chest compressions on a mannequin for 2 min in each of the three different positions, with a 1-week interval between each position.

      Results

      The number of adequate compressions (depth > 50 mm) and the mean compression depth were significantly greater in the kneeling and footstool positions than in the standing position, but there was no significant difference between the kneeling and footstool positions. There were no significant differences in the compression rate, the percentage of correctly released compressions, and the percentage of compressions performed using the correct hand position among the three rescuer positions.

      Conclusion

      The mean compression depth and the number of adequate compressions were greater for both the kneeling and footstool positions than for the standing position during 2 min of CPR. We recommend kneeling on a bed or standing on a footstool as the rescuer positions during hospital CPR on a bed.

      Keywords

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