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Ingested Foreign Body Associated With Bulimia Nervosa

      A 19-year-old female college student presented to the Emergency Department (ED) after the unintentional ingestion of a spoon during a purging episode. She was otherwise asymptomatic and vital signs were stable. She had a diagnosis of bulimia nervosa, and her frequency of self-induced vomiting had increased from once per week to three times per week since her recent arrival at college.
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