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Comparison of Oral Ibuprofen and Acetaminophen with Either Analgesic Alone for Pediatric Emergency Department Patients with Acute Pain

      Highlights

      • Ibuprofen and Acetaminophen are two most commonly used analgesics in the pediatric ED.
      • The multimodal pain management of using a combination of ibuprofen and acetaminophen has the potential to result in greater analgesia.
      • Randomized, double-blind superiority trial comparing analgesic efficacy of a combination of oral ibuprofen (10 mg/kg dose)/acetaminophen (15 mg/kg per dose) to either analgesic alone for treatment of pain in the pediatric ED.
      • Combination of oral ibuprofen/acetaminophen is not superior to each analgesic alone for short-term treatment of acute pain in pediatric ED.

      Abstract

      Background

      Ibuprofen (Motrin; Johnson & Johnson) and acetaminophen (APAP, paracetamol) are the most commonly used analgesics in the pediatric emergency department (ED) for managing a variety of acute traumatic and nontraumatic painful conditions. The multimodal pain management of using a combination of ibuprofen plus acetaminophen has the potential to result in greater analgesia.

      Objective

      We compared the analgesic efficacy of a combination of oral ibuprofen plus acetaminophen with either analgesic alone for pediatric ED patients with acute pain.

      Methods

      We performed a randomized, double-blind superiority trial assessing and comparing the analgesic efficacy of a combination of oral ibuprofen (10 mg/kg dose) plus acetaminophen (15 mg/kg per dose) to either analgesic alone for the treatment of acute traumatic and nontraumatic pain in the pediatric ED. Primary outcomes included a difference in pain scores among the three groups at 60 min.

      Results

      We enrolled 90 patients (30 per group). The difference in mean pain scores at 60 min between acetaminophen and combination groups was 0.30 (95% confidence interval [CI] −0.84 to 1.83); between ibuprofen and combination groups was −0.33 (95% CI −1.47 to 0.80); and between acetaminophen and ibuprofen groups was 0.63 (95% CI −0.54 to 1.81). Reductions in pain scores from baseline to 60 min were similar for all patients in each of the three groups. No adverse events occurred in any group.

      Conclusions

      We found similar analgesic efficacy of oral ibuprofen and acetaminophen in comparison with each analgesic alone for short-term treatment of acute pain in the pediatric ED, but the trial was underpowered to demonstrate the analgesic superiority of the combination of oral ibuprofen plus acetaminophen in comparison with each analgesic alone.

      Keywords

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