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Electrocardiographic Slow Dancing: Who Takes the Lead?

  • Benjamin L. Cooper
    Correspondence
    Reprint Address: Benjamin L. Cooper, Department of Emergency Medicine, McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 6431 Fannin Street, JJL 260, Houston, TX 77030
    Affiliations
    Department of Emergency Medicine, McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas
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  • John C. Waller-Delarosa
    Affiliations
    Department of Emergency Medicine, McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas
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      A 39-year-old woman without significant medical history presented to the emergency department for generalized abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting of several days’ duration. On arrival, the patient's heart rate was 58 beats/min, temperature was 98.2°F, respiratory rate was 20 breaths/min, O2 saturation was 100% on room air, and blood pressure was 130/69 mm Hg. The patient was well-appearing, in no acute distress, and had moderate tenderness to the right lower quadrant. A 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) was obtained (Figure 1).
      Figure 1
      Figure 1Electrocardiogram obtained on patient arrival.

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