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Pain and Acute Vision Loss Secondary to Microbial Keratitis: A Contact Lens-Related Complication

      Approximately 45 million individuals in the United States wear contact lenses to correct refractive error, maintain ocular health, or for cosmetic reasons (
      • Verani JR
      • Lorick SA
      • Yoder JS
      • et al.
      National outbreak of Acanthamoeba keratitis associated with use of a contact lens solution, United States.
      ). There has been an increasing trend in the number of contact lens users and microbial corneal infections (keratitis). Contact lens wear represents 30% to 50% of all microbial keratitis cases, costing the U.S. health care system $175 million annually (
      • Sauer A
      • Meyer N
      • Bourcier T
      French Study Group for Contact Lens-Related Microbial Keratitis
      Risk factors for contact lens-related microbial keratitis: a case-control multicenter study.
      ,

      Collier SA, Gronostaj MP, MacGurn AK, et al. National Hospital Ambulatory Care Medical Survey of Outpatient Departments. 2010. Availible at: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6345a3.htm?s_cid=mm6345a3_e. Accessed Jan 4, 2022.

      ). Corneal infections are an ophthalmic emergency as they can either cause ulceration and perforation of the cornea or disseminate to the intraocular tissues, leading to irreversible blindness. Severe infections such as these lead to vision loss among 1 in 500 contact lens users annually (
      • Sauer A
      • Meyer N
      • Bourcier T
      French Study Group for Contact Lens-Related Microbial Keratitis
      Risk factors for contact lens-related microbial keratitis: a case-control multicenter study.
      ). As such, appropriate and timely treatment of a corneal infection is extremely important.

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      References

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        • Lorick SA
        • Yoder JS
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        National outbreak of Acanthamoeba keratitis associated with use of a contact lens solution, United States.
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        Risk factors for contact lens-related microbial keratitis: a case-control multicenter study.
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      2. Collier SA, Gronostaj MP, MacGurn AK, et al. National Hospital Ambulatory Care Medical Survey of Outpatient Departments. 2010. Availible at: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6345a3.htm?s_cid=mm6345a3_e. Accessed Jan 4, 2022.

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