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“Machine Learning as an Adjunct to Traditional Triage in the Emergency Department”

      There are many applications of artificial intelligence (AI) in medicine, however, few clinicians have familiarity or experience with them. Machine learning, a subset of AI is the use of computers to “learn” and improve performance based on data provided without programming.
      • Chang Anthony C.
      Intelligence-Based Medicine: Artificial Intelligence and Human Cognition in Clinical Medicine and Healthcare.
      Data is analyzed based on labeled outcomes in so-called supervised learning. Deep learning is computationally more complex and is said to mimic the human brain with interactions involving artificial neural networks. These methods suffer from a “black box” phenomenon that are poorly understood by clinicians, other than those who have a strong knowledge of computer science. A summary of publications utilizing AI in Emergency Medicine (EM) provides specific examples in the domains of prehospital care, patient triage and disposition, prediction of ailments and conditions, and emergency department (ED) management.
      • Tang
      • Ang C.K.E.
      • Constantinides T.
      • Rajinikanth V.
      • Acharya U.R.
      • Cheong K.H
      Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in Emergency Medicine.
      For clinicians and their medical directors, a practical application involves applying machine learning to develop a more accurate triage process beyond the commonly used ESI system.
      • Lee
      • Hsieh C.-C.
      • Lin C.-H.
      • Lin Y.-J.
      • Kao C.-Y
      Prediction of hospitalization using artificial intelligence for urgent patients in the emergency department.
      ,
      • Levin S.
      • Toerper M.
      • Hamrock E.
      • Hinson J.S.
      • Barnes S.
      • Gardner H.
      • Dugas A.
      • Linton B.
      • Kirsch T.
      • Kelen G.
      Machine-Learning-Based Electronic Triage More Accurately Differentiates Patients With Respect to Clinical Outcomes Compared With the Emergency Severity Index.
      This promises to increase patient safety such that those that need care more urgently are prioritized.
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      References

        • Chang Anthony C.
        Intelligence-Based Medicine: Artificial Intelligence and Human Cognition in Clinical Medicine and Healthcare.
        Academic Press, 2020
        • Tang
        • Ang C.K.E.
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        • Rajinikanth V.
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        Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in Emergency Medicine.
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        Machine-Learning-Based Electronic Triage More Accurately Differentiates Patients With Respect to Clinical Outcomes Compared With the Emergency Severity Index.
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